Q. Are pacers and support crews giving some ultra runners an advantage? #UltraRunning #UKRunChat

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  • Running poles making ascents and descents easier
  • GPS to making navigation a doddle
  • Compression kit to reduce muscle fatigue

What do all these things have in common? These are all aids many of us use to help complete long distance endurance events.

I use running poles when allowed, I almost always use a GPS device even if a map isn’t loaded on to it and before I realised compression kit was causing all sorts of injury problems I would often be found in ridiculously tight fitting attire.

There are two aid types though that I wonder about, the first I don’t use, the second I do (when I can convince the GingaNinja to rock up to a race registration).

Pacers and Crews: The aid I don’t use that I’m referring to are pacers and it was after seeing some amazing finishes at hundred milers and the like that got me wondering if using a pacer increases the likelihood of a finish and whether by using them are runners on a level playing field?

The other aid are crews – which I do, on occasion, use and I believe that in the early days of my ultra marathoning I really wouldn’t have gotten very far without a crew and the support they offer. But do they give me and others who use them an edge on race day?

Reading lots of recent race reports and talking to runners it’s clear that there is an appetite for the use of both pacers and crews but does it take away something of the challenge? Increasingly my view is becoming that yes, these things are taking away from something that, at its best, in my opinion, is a solo sport.

Perhaps if they’re going to be in play there should be greater scrutiny about how a crew and pacers can be used as I’ve witnessed some things during recent races that has made me wonder if too much crew access and too much pacing is creating an unfortunate imbalance in ultra marathons.

I met a Spanish runner at about 30 miles into an unsupported race recently and we ran together for maybe 12 miles. I enjoyed his company very much but the curious thing was that his crew met him at five different points along the route during the time we were together. Each time he would stop, chat, change kit, have a nibble, check his route, have a sit in the warm vehicle etc. It felt like the spirit of the race was not being adhered to and there were others too during this particular event that had cars literally following them down the roads – with family members joining in for a few miles as pacers – picking up food at McDonalds, etc. I’ve met people who’ve run past their homes or near enough to detour and been witness to them going indoors, changing wet or filthy kit, filling up food and then simply popping back on the route – all I should point out, within the rules of the race. I don’t begrudge this level of support – hell, if I could get it my DNF percentage wouldn’t be so high! However, though I’m far from a purist in running terms I do feel this takes some of the shine off the effort required.

The pacer question is very much a personal choice and are often subject to specific race rules but for me these are an aid that detract from one of the most important aspects of a race – the mental challenge. I could pluck an arbitrary percentage out of the air but I’d suggest that most endurance races are won and lost in the mind and not in the body. The pacer therefore can have a real, tangible effect on a racers performance and we are back to the point about imbalance.

All this said though I’ve been known to buddy up with runners on a route in order to ensure a finish although always with the agreement that if the pacing didn’t match we’d say goodbye and good journey. That changed a little bit when on the South Wales 50 when myself and two other runners joined up on the course then formalised our pacing/team running strategy to ensure that we all finished. It was perhaps this more than anything that got me wondering about just how much of a difference a pacer can make. Now to be fair Ryan, Pete and myself were all pretty ruined by the time we’d hooked up and it was as much about surviving the night as it was pacing but it gave me an insight to what a fresh pair of legs or a fresh attitude can do for a very tired ultra runner.

These days I’m much more a social ultra runner rather than a competitive one and I tend not to think too much about my position in the field, preferring to concentrate on taking in my surroundings and having a lovely time. However, this has got me wondering just how much better I might be if I had a team right next to me pushing me forward?

The purity argument: The reason I suppose I don’t do that and put together a team to get me through these things is simply because of my belief in the solo element. I probably would be a better runner if there was someone in my ear for the final 50 miles pushing me that little bit harder or if I had a crew with lots of kit ready and waiting. However, for me ultra running is being out there, facing myself and a trail and although I can very much respect other people’s decisions for using pacers and crews it’s less and less suited to me. Perhaps evidence of this was that the last time the GingaNinja crewed for me was the Thames Path 100 in 2015 – here she met me several times armed with chocolate milk, kit options and a regular stern talking to but since then she’s mainly been at starts and finishes if there at all and in truth I prefer this. Although it’s scary to think you’re on your own it really does heighten the elation (for me) upon completion.

All this said I’ll still be using poles (periodically) and GPS – I’m not giving those up anytime soon, I mean I’m not completely stupid! Therefore am I a hypocrite for suggesting pacers and crews detract from a level race but I’m perfectly content to gain an edge by using kit that some call ‘cheat sticks’ or by buddying up inside an event? I suppose it’s an individuals view and more importantly a race directors view and if you (or perhaps I) don’t like it well then I don’t have to sign up to that race.

And so… I’m curious about your views on pacers and crews, do you feel they offer you a better chance of finishing well? Do you think they give some runners an advantage that others don’t have? Would you consider them a hindrance? Or are they simply part of your ultra running armoury?

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9 comments
  1. If support & pacers are within the rules of a particular event then they’re not cheats & vice-versa. For preference I think support crews should be allowed at designated points only and pacers should be banned except in circumstances where on a particular section the terrain is genuinely dangerous & the runner may be fatigued.

    • ultraboycreates said:

      I wouldn’t ever suggest it’s a cheat but more an advantage to have pacers and crews. I can very much agree with your preferences, I think part of the issue is the huge expansion of ultra running and it’s become an all comers sport (which is good in many ways) but has had to adapt to the all comers needs and the race organisers don’t really have the capacity to manage and judge pacers, crews or those taking liberties with those rules

  2. Its definately an advantage. Ive seen crews litteraly 3miles from the start at one event and have to wonder why at such a short distance. Ultra are becoming more mainstream as they are now the new marathon. I personaly like the solo element and self supported ones makes me feel ive achieved more.

    • ultraboycreates said:

      I’m very much of the same mind. I’m not against pacers and crews, they make ultra running a little more achievable and more accessible in my opinion. However, I run ultras because they are hard, taking you to your limit and making you fight to earn your rewards. I just wouldn’t want the toughness or struggle I feel to be lessened.

      • Agreed, ive found that there is more emphasis put on the comercial aspect now. It become more about the goodies or cp stops than the event. Guess its a sign of the times,

      • ultraboycreates said:

        I can’t disagree – however, it’s still possible to find small, intimate and occasionally brutal races. I’m off to the Isle of Arran in a couple of weeks and I know he that will be all the things I look for in racing!

      • Yeah theres some great little event around. I like the beyond marathon guys, no fuss events. I looked at a climb southwest event covering dartmoor and exmoor coast to coast 400 qid. I have to take my own tent, then pay extra for transport and wondered what im actualy paying for so im doimg it myself next year lol

      • ultraboycreates said:

        Love Beyond Marathon, did Meriden this year and I’ll go back. Like your idea of truly going solo too – I’m thinking the Charlie Ramsay Round for solo training adventures next year – be something new!

      • I didmeriden so much fun, brutal on my legs though but as i won the first spoon i had to complete. Im planning to solo all the national parks next year as runand wild camps. Good look with that there pretty brutal

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